Julien's Report on "KAKUCHI LIFE"

Julien Lamberto

Rainbow in Shobara – Finding Beauty in the Countryside

September 9, 2018

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    A few weeks ago, I had the chance to see a rainbow in Shobara, which inspired me to write about it. A rainbow may simply be a rainbow to some, but to me I couldn’t help but think about what makes a rainbow possible and what it symbolizes. A rainbow is much more than a majestic light show in the sky. It is, in fact, the byproduct of trillions of tiny photons of light traveling millions of kilometers across the vastness of space from our sun and refracted by our Earth’s atmosphere. An appreciation of the science behind what makes a rainbow possible somehow makes it seem much more impressive to me. Furthermore, this display of colorful beauty in the sky represented possibility and hope. Life is, after all, largely what you make of it and how you view things can have a significant impact on how successful you are.

Taking English Teaching Beyond the Classroom

August 20, 2018

    While the school’s in Hiroshima are still on summer holiday I, like all other Assistant Language Teacher’s in Hiroshima, have yet to interact with my students inside the classroom. This fact, however, has not stopped me from finding ways to interact with my students outside of class.
    Since beginning my tenure as an ALT at Kakuchi Senior High School, I have actively participated in several of the different clubs including, the soccer club, the basketball club, and even the girl’s volleyball club. Through my participation in each of these club activities, I am consistently reminded of the substantial gap in energy between myself and my students. While getting older stops being fun after college, I appreciate the underlying reason why I participate in each of these clubs to begin with – it is not necessarily to win, but to create a friendly atmosphere at Kakuchi and to enhance the exchange of ideas between myself, my students, and my colleagues.
    This past weekend, for example, I had the chance to play volleyball with the girl’s volleyball team after receiving an invitation from Hashimoto Sensei (my supervisor). Within a few short minutes of our practice game commencing, both myself, my team, and the opposing side quickly realized that Julien Sensei had completely forgotten how to play volleyball.
    Embarrassing as this situation was, my students and my supervisor were very encouraging to me, even though I suspected I was probably violating a half dozen rules during the game. For me, though, the embarrassment was well worth the opportunity to interact with my students and gain their trust. I believe this trust will prove invaluable in the classroom.


Breaking down language and language and cultural barriers one goal at a time

August 4, 2018

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August 4, 2018. Kakuchi Senior High School’s soccer team.

    As an English Assistant Language Teacher (ALT) at Shobara Kakuchi Senior High School, I feel very lucky to have a job that allows me to do two things I greatly enjoy: teach English and play soccer. This past weekend on August 4th, I had a great time playing soccer with my some of my students. Though my soccer ability is not what it once was and despite my lack of Japanese ability, I felt that this experience was a great way to connect with some of my students and help them gain the confidence they need to become versatile English speakers.
    I’m looking forward to the coming year in Shobara and the opportunity to learn more from my Japanese students and colleagues.